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When Does A Phone Become A Niche ?
#1
With the removal of the headphone jack, Apple has turned away another part of the market that had not yet been turned away by iOS's walled garden ecosystem and deliberately chronic lack of features.

Before the iPhone6 was released two years ago, iOS's market share was 11.7% whereas Android's market share was over 80%. Yet, nobody call the iPhone a niche product. In fact, many in the media talked about iOS as though it was the only mobile platform on the market. BlackBerry's 3.x% market share and deliberate focus on enterprise resulted in many people calling BlackBerrys niche products.

So the question becomes: how low does a product/platform's market share and market segment focus have to shrink before we could/should call it a niche ?
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#2
When the product is not in the top 2 apparently...

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#3
With the Pressitude love for Apple, think it will take a while for iPhone to be a niche device.
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#4
The question is, when does it stop being a douche device.

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#5
I'll doubt that day will ever come.
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#6
Interesting question, Bartron. It seems part of the answer lies in the ability to readily identify a particular, intended market segment. If this is true, I don't know what Apple's is, so it seems a niche label doesn't apply, according to this definition.

It seems some market share measure would apply as well, as you indicated, but I don't know what that is or even what the experts would say about this.
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#7
Here's what Wikipedia says....

"A niche market[1] is the subset of the market on which a specific product is focused. The market niche defines as the product features aimed at satisfying specific market needs, as well as the price range, production quality and the demographics that is intended to impact. It is also a small market segment. For example, sports channels like STAR Sports, ESPN, STAR Cricket, and Fox Sports target a niche of sports enthusiasts.

Every product can be defined by its market niche. The niche market is highly specialized, and aiming to survive among the competition from numerous super companies. Even established companies create products for different niches, for example, Hewlett-Packard has all-in-one machines for printing, scanning and faxing targeted for the home office niche while at the same time having separate machines with one of these functions for big businesses.[2]

In practice, product vendors and trade businesses are commonly referred as mainstream providers or narrow demographics niche market providers (colloquially shortened to just niche market providers). Small capital providers usually opt for a niche market with narrow demographics as a measure of increasing their financial gain margins.

The final product quality (low or high) is not dependent on the price elasticity of demand, but the specific needs that the product is aimed to satisfy and, in some cases, aspects of brand recognition (e.g. prestige, practicability, money saving, expensiveness, environmental conscience, or social status)."

Seems the pricing non-elasticity to demand due to prestige applies to Apple.
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#8
Last line nailed it. Apple becomes niche market soon. :)
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#9
(20-09-2016, 06:58 AM)james pisano Wrote: Interesting question, Bartron. It seems part of the answer lies in the ability to readily identify a particular, intended market segment. If this is true, I don't know what Apple's is, so it seems a niche label doesn't apply, according to this definition.

Apple's intended market segment is historically the arts: music, graphic arts, etc. They became mass market, but over the past several years tons of users have moved away from iOS because of the limitations of the iPhone and iOS.

By maintaining those limitations, Apple is passively shutting out certain segments of the market. The removal of the headphone jack shuts out those users who want to use the headphone jack. And if they replace Bluetooth with another wireless tech for headphones, they'll shut out another segment of the market. So the question becomes, how many more segments of the market does Apple have to shut out before they are considered niche ?
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#10
Leave it to James to write a #*@$ book

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