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Apple vs court order
#11
Again, this Apple vs FBI is a publicity BS.

Read this..

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/20...efore.html

They've done it before. So, there's nothing new!

If you can't iNnovate anymore, try DRAMA.
(And get the people's sympathy..)

Lmfao!
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#12
It's like HBO drama...

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#13
It's like totally boring. Apple news is non-news.
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#14
(18-02-2016, 08:11 PM)HYMAN Wrote: Again, this Apple vs FBI is a publicity BS.

Read this..

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/20...efore.html

They've done it before. So, there's nothing new!

If you can't iNnovate anymore, try DRAMA.
(And get the people's sympathy..)

Lmfao!

I agree Hyman, nothing but a publicity stunt..."at Apple we value our users privacy" what a joke!! So Apple chooses to make a stand on privacy by protecting a killers rights who took innocent lives, he no longer has any rights!
Martin
BlackBerry 10 

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#15
This whole position by Apple is purely PR and capitalizing on something to make themselves look better. When you read the letter signed by Timbo (written by one of their hacks), you can see how it's so loaded with emotional words. Just as in my thread about cool, the words used try to evoke a feeling of repulsion towards what the government wants done. That's a way to make something less cool in the minds of those reading it. Since they have caved in before, this is nothing more than a way to build up a facade of privacy protection so they look good. Behind that facade, we know it's all BS. They lost face with the Snowden revelations and are now trying to Polish their image. Nothing more. Nothing less.
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#16
(19-02-2016, 12:20 AM)Schmurf. Wrote: This whole position by Apple is purely PR and capitalizing on something to make themselves look better. When you read the letter signed by Timbo (written by one of their hacks), you can see how it's so loaded with emotional words. Just as in my thread about cool, the words used try to evoke a feeling of repulsion towards what the government wants done. That's a way to make something less cool in the minds of those reading it. Since they have caved in before, this is nothing more than a way to build up a facade of privacy protection so they look good. Behind that facade, we know it's all BS. They lost face with the Snowden revelations and are now trying to Polish their image. Nothing more. Nothing less.

No CEO make a statement without a purpose. I've been trying to figure out Apple angle in this. Is the company hiding its incompetence on its engineering side when it comes to security? Does one actually own the phone when one purchase a mobile device? Remember the last case in Canada when a widow just want to access her late husband music that Apple make her jump through hoops before a media report shame the company into releasing the password? Granted she did not own the device herself. So what's the excuse in this case? San Bernandino County Department of Public Health owns the phone. Not the dead terrorist. And the County is permitting the FBI all excess to the phone, so why is Apple all hell bend on making such a spectacle out of what seems to be an obvious decision? Even as a PR stunt, it's quite risky to pick on a subject that involve domestic terrorism that had 14 massacred and 22 injured. Believe me when I say corporations are chickenshit when it comes to PR stunt especially picking side on social and political issues, they usually avoided until there's a clear stance they could safely side with. Even Tim Cook a g-a-y(have to type it this way because the word get censor for odd reason) man took him decades to come out. But I'm not here to talk about his personal life rather emphasize the point of making a public statement from a corporation stand point does not usually intended to elicit reaction from the public let alone fanning the outrage on both sides. This sort of tactic usually employed by politicians running for elections. When politicians who do not have clear idea of a platform, when politicians who want to muddying up their own incompetence by pointing the finger at their opponents. The more incompetent, the louder they shout just to confuse and prevent the public from looking deeper into the candidates. Sounds familiar? So what Apple does not want it's shareholders, customers and it's competitor to know? That its devices security is build like a Jenga block that could collapse by removing one piece within the hardware? The danger of it is Apple is wrapping itself with the privacy issue that is putting all of our liberty in jeopardy. I akin the situation to a terrorist surround itself with a bunch children that greatly divide the public opinion. Aren't we all exhausted of dealing with terrorists?
Playbook>Bold 9900>Z10>Z30>Passport.
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#17
(18-02-2016, 10:05 PM)DickLewis13 Wrote: It's like totally boring. Apple news is non-news.
I don't agree DL. I think this mess is highly pertinent to BlackBerry users. Depending on how this case unravels, this could lead to some very strict, and frightening regulations dealing with encryption I'm general. Tim Cook is creating a situation of government vs encryption. And I believe it's on purpose.

This is the equivalent of Cook not being able to win the game, so he steals the ball so no one else can play

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#18
Agree, not what I meant with my post. Just sick of reading about Apple.

(19-02-2016, 05:54 AM)Brad Wrote: I don't agree DL. I think this mess is highly pertinent to BlackBerry users. Depending on how this case unravels, this could lead to some very strict, and frightening regulations dealing with encryption I'm general. Tim Cook is creating a situation of government vs encryption. And I believe it's on purpose.

This is the equivalent of Cook not being able to win the game, so he steals the ball so no one else can play

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#19
It's odd to me that Apple would make such a big deal of something they have caved on in the past and how the FBI would also much such a big deal presuming they have some success in th past. The conspiracy theorist in me thinks there is more to this posturing than meets the eye. What if the government was in cahoots with Apple to push the security issue and make it appear that they can't break an iPhone? Then it becomes a win-win. Apple gets a shiny image as someone who stands up to the government and their devices are perceived as being more secure than they are and the government looks like they can't break into something they actually can. Against that's just the conspiracy theorist voice in my head.
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#20
im surprised this is such a big news. and Feds not able to open an iPhone is a joke. like someone said above, they are setting it up to make apple look good and kill encryption for good.
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