Another Day, Another Obscure BlackBerry is Dead Reference

It still seems that no matter how long has passed there is still someone who believes that BlackBerry is dead.  So today as I was reading through ZDNet, I discovered an article with the title “Windows Phone and BlackBerry head for extinction, leaving the smartphone market to Android and iOS”.  These are not new headlines.  In fact, they are becoming so common that I shift my reading to other sources simply to shake things up a bit.  We at UTB have written extensively about why the words “BlackBerry” “Dead” and “is” do not belong in the same sentence without the word “not”.  I was, however, curious this day.  So I decided to read it.

Did it say that BlackBerry is Dead?

Effectively the article states that, since BlackBerry’s market-share has gone from 0.3 percent to 0.1 percent, it’s dead.  The article’s true target however is Microsoft.  Their market-share has gone from 2.5 to 0.6 percent in the last year.  However, because this is about mobile phones, BlackBerry deserves a mention.  The author argues for there only being two viable ecosystems and that Microsoft and BlackBerry should jump ship.  The problem I have with the content here is the shortsightedness of the conclusion.  Many in the tech world are saying the same thing.  Without an economically robust smartphone division your tech company is dead.

DTEK50_Angle1_onWhite_revWhat does it say about the Mobile Landscape?

What we are seeing here is a missed opportunity, a chance to play a part in shaping the things to come.  There seems to be three areas of reporting when it comes to BlackBerry.  First are those who are crying for BlackBerry’s death and seem to gain some perverse pleasure with every knock the company takes.  Then are those who are reporting BlackBerry’s death as inevitable and something they have always seen, but lament the loss of choice BlackBerry represents.  Lastly are those who see the true scope of what BlackBerry is.  BlackBerry is about more than mobile handsets.  For that reason we confidently say that BlackBerry is Dead (NOT!)

The mobile landscape it more than mobile handsets.  Microsoft is, like BlackBerry, more than just handsets.  The author at least acknowledges that when he refers to Windows Phone rather than Microsoft.  However the shortsightedness of using BlackBerry without referring to their hardware DIVISION shows why this is simply another attempt at lumping BlackBerry in as an offhand reference.

More than just devices. Photo Credit: www.bluecoat.com/
More than just devices.
Photo Credit: www.bluecoat.com/

Can there be a Mobile Landscape without Mobile Devices?

It’s a great question. Popular media doesn’t seem to be able to differentiate between mobile devices and mobile landscape.  If we add cloud computing, secure containers, VPN’s, IoT and cross platform software solutions, we see that mobility is more than simply having a phone in your hand.  It is true that without a handset you cannot access that information.  If, however, we boiled down the television industry to who sold the most television sets, we would be grossly misinterpreting the market.  It’s the same with the mobile landscape.  To say that it’s all about device profitability, grossly underestimates the market.

If you’re here, then you understand that BlackBerry is more than just another device maker.  They are more than just BB10 and Blackdroid.   BlackBerry is about a solution.  With BlackBerry in your corner you don’t just have a powerful and secure mobile handset.  With BlackBerry you have a team of people who are finding solutions for your communications and data handling needs.  BlackBerry is alive and well and living in your ecosystems keeping you going from day to day.  What the future holds no one knows, but I can assure you that BlackBerry is a strong and vibrant part of it.

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Chaplain_Clancy

Chap has been a BlackBerry user since 2009 when he picked up his trusty new Torch 9800. Since then he has been about all things BlackBerry keeping tabs on the Australian market. As a hobby he also supports an Australian Aged Care organisation as their in-house spiritual practitioner.

  • razrrob

    Nice post Chap!

    The author conveniently missed the part about PRIV and DTEK50 running Android (Marshmallow)

  • Jope28

    The ZDNET article isn’t talking about BlackBerry the company. Just their in-house OS.
    They clearly say: “leaving the smartphone market to Android and iOS.
    The mobile operating system market is a two-horse race now, and it’s likely to stay that way for the foreseeable future.”

    They’re not contradicting any of your points. The author makes it clear that he’s talking about “platform”.

    • Chaplain_Clancy

      And I quote:
      “BlackBerry, once the flagship brand for government and corporate smartphone users, is in serious trouble, made worse by the fact that its transition to Android isn’t going well.”

      and

      “The death of Windows Phone and BlackBerry is good news for Android because that’s the platform benefiting the most.”

      The author may have the OS on his mind, but his words are talking about BlackBerry as a whole. Also even though the author noted that BlackBerry has entered the Android World, he seems to think that since BlackBerry appear to be struggling in that arena, they will be the only Android players not part of Android in the future. This article could have been solely about Windows Phone. BlackBerry are a throw away part of the argument.

  • Alan

    And BlackBerry lives on, and despite it all BlackBerry continues to create cool phones with the most powerful security/privacy software in the World! Long live, BlackBerry. Bring it on.

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